ChaoticBliss
Smiles.and Little things that matter.
ChaoticBliss
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tipsforarchitectureschool:

archatlas:

Architects Yannick Martin

Nice!! Look at this!
tipsforarchitectureschool:

archatlas:

Architects Yannick Martin

Nice!! Look at this!
tipsforarchitectureschool:

archatlas:

Architects Yannick Martin

Nice!! Look at this!
tipsforarchitectureschool:

archatlas:

Architects Yannick Martin

Nice!! Look at this!
tipsforarchitectureschool:

archatlas:

Architects Yannick Martin

Nice!! Look at this!
tipsforarchitectureschool:

archatlas:

Architects Yannick Martin

Nice!! Look at this!
tipsforarchitectureschool:

archatlas:

Architects Yannick Martin

Nice!! Look at this!
tipsforarchitectureschool:

archatlas:

Architects Yannick Martin

Nice!! Look at this!
tipsforarchitectureschool:

archatlas:

Architects Yannick Martin

Nice!! Look at this!
tipsforarchitectureschool:

archatlas:

Architects Yannick Martin

Nice!! Look at this!
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abdmasoud:

المرء عدو ما يجهل
Human being are mostely against what they do not know
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"ما قيمة هذه الدنيا التي تتعلقون بها ؟ ..

“What is the value of this world that you cling to?"

Irwin Shaw, Bury The Dead

Translated by : purelymodest

(via wordsnquotes)
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"يا قلبُ.. مالكَ في اكتئابٍ لستَ تعرفُ ما تُريد؟!
Oh heart! why are you so gloom, unsure of what you want?"

بدر السيّاب

Submitted by: colorful-disorder 

(via warag-3nb)
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typeworship:

This has already done the rounds, but I’m mesmerised by this brush so had to post: “All you down strokes are thick, all you up strokes are thin…snap to the right, up thin.”

Typeverything.com
Roundhand Lettering Demo by Glen Weisge.
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laughingsquid:

Beautiful Wooden Tables With Glass Inlays Inspired by the Rivers and Ponds of the Pacific Northwest
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positivelypersistentteach:

actsofknittery:

thegirlwhocriedfoxface:


(x)

Never have I hit reblog so quickly.

All little girls should see this. Truly inspiring!

The artist had a much different purpose for making these than the Tumblr audience seems to understand.  In this article, David Trumble (the artist), is quoted as saying:

“This was a response to the furor kicked up over the glossy ‘princessification’ of Pixar’s Merida character, both in image and doll form. I drew this picture because I wanted to analyze how unnecessary it is to collapse a heroine into one specific mold, to give them all the same sparkly fashion, the same tiny figures, and the same homogenized plastic smile.
My experience of female role models both in culture and in life has shown me that there is no mold for what makes someone a role model, and the whole point of Merida was that she was a step in the right direction, providing girls with an alternative kind of princess. Then they took two steps back, and painted her with the same glossy brush as the rest. So I decided to take 10 real-life female role models, from diverse experiences and backgrounds, and filter them through the Disney princess assembly line.
“The result was this cartoon, which earned equal parts praise and ire from readers. Some didn’t get the joke, some disagreed with it, others saw no harm in it at all and wanted to buy the doll versions of them… it was a polarizing image, but I suppose that’s the point. The statement I wanted to make was that it makes no sense to put these real-life women into one limited template, so why then are we doing it to our fictitious heroines?
positivelypersistentteach:

actsofknittery:

thegirlwhocriedfoxface:


(x)

Never have I hit reblog so quickly.

All little girls should see this. Truly inspiring!

The artist had a much different purpose for making these than the Tumblr audience seems to understand.  In this article, David Trumble (the artist), is quoted as saying:

“This was a response to the furor kicked up over the glossy ‘princessification’ of Pixar’s Merida character, both in image and doll form. I drew this picture because I wanted to analyze how unnecessary it is to collapse a heroine into one specific mold, to give them all the same sparkly fashion, the same tiny figures, and the same homogenized plastic smile.
My experience of female role models both in culture and in life has shown me that there is no mold for what makes someone a role model, and the whole point of Merida was that she was a step in the right direction, providing girls with an alternative kind of princess. Then they took two steps back, and painted her with the same glossy brush as the rest. So I decided to take 10 real-life female role models, from diverse experiences and backgrounds, and filter them through the Disney princess assembly line.
“The result was this cartoon, which earned equal parts praise and ire from readers. Some didn’t get the joke, some disagreed with it, others saw no harm in it at all and wanted to buy the doll versions of them… it was a polarizing image, but I suppose that’s the point. The statement I wanted to make was that it makes no sense to put these real-life women into one limited template, so why then are we doing it to our fictitious heroines?
positivelypersistentteach:

actsofknittery:

thegirlwhocriedfoxface:


(x)

Never have I hit reblog so quickly.

All little girls should see this. Truly inspiring!

The artist had a much different purpose for making these than the Tumblr audience seems to understand.  In this article, David Trumble (the artist), is quoted as saying:

“This was a response to the furor kicked up over the glossy ‘princessification’ of Pixar’s Merida character, both in image and doll form. I drew this picture because I wanted to analyze how unnecessary it is to collapse a heroine into one specific mold, to give them all the same sparkly fashion, the same tiny figures, and the same homogenized plastic smile.
My experience of female role models both in culture and in life has shown me that there is no mold for what makes someone a role model, and the whole point of Merida was that she was a step in the right direction, providing girls with an alternative kind of princess. Then they took two steps back, and painted her with the same glossy brush as the rest. So I decided to take 10 real-life female role models, from diverse experiences and backgrounds, and filter them through the Disney princess assembly line.
“The result was this cartoon, which earned equal parts praise and ire from readers. Some didn’t get the joke, some disagreed with it, others saw no harm in it at all and wanted to buy the doll versions of them… it was a polarizing image, but I suppose that’s the point. The statement I wanted to make was that it makes no sense to put these real-life women into one limited template, so why then are we doing it to our fictitious heroines?
positivelypersistentteach:

actsofknittery:

thegirlwhocriedfoxface:


(x)

Never have I hit reblog so quickly.

All little girls should see this. Truly inspiring!

The artist had a much different purpose for making these than the Tumblr audience seems to understand.  In this article, David Trumble (the artist), is quoted as saying:

“This was a response to the furor kicked up over the glossy ‘princessification’ of Pixar’s Merida character, both in image and doll form. I drew this picture because I wanted to analyze how unnecessary it is to collapse a heroine into one specific mold, to give them all the same sparkly fashion, the same tiny figures, and the same homogenized plastic smile.
My experience of female role models both in culture and in life has shown me that there is no mold for what makes someone a role model, and the whole point of Merida was that she was a step in the right direction, providing girls with an alternative kind of princess. Then they took two steps back, and painted her with the same glossy brush as the rest. So I decided to take 10 real-life female role models, from diverse experiences and backgrounds, and filter them through the Disney princess assembly line.
“The result was this cartoon, which earned equal parts praise and ire from readers. Some didn’t get the joke, some disagreed with it, others saw no harm in it at all and wanted to buy the doll versions of them… it was a polarizing image, but I suppose that’s the point. The statement I wanted to make was that it makes no sense to put these real-life women into one limited template, so why then are we doing it to our fictitious heroines?
positivelypersistentteach:

actsofknittery:

thegirlwhocriedfoxface:


(x)

Never have I hit reblog so quickly.

All little girls should see this. Truly inspiring!

The artist had a much different purpose for making these than the Tumblr audience seems to understand.  In this article, David Trumble (the artist), is quoted as saying:

“This was a response to the furor kicked up over the glossy ‘princessification’ of Pixar’s Merida character, both in image and doll form. I drew this picture because I wanted to analyze how unnecessary it is to collapse a heroine into one specific mold, to give them all the same sparkly fashion, the same tiny figures, and the same homogenized plastic smile.
My experience of female role models both in culture and in life has shown me that there is no mold for what makes someone a role model, and the whole point of Merida was that she was a step in the right direction, providing girls with an alternative kind of princess. Then they took two steps back, and painted her with the same glossy brush as the rest. So I decided to take 10 real-life female role models, from diverse experiences and backgrounds, and filter them through the Disney princess assembly line.
“The result was this cartoon, which earned equal parts praise and ire from readers. Some didn’t get the joke, some disagreed with it, others saw no harm in it at all and wanted to buy the doll versions of them… it was a polarizing image, but I suppose that’s the point. The statement I wanted to make was that it makes no sense to put these real-life women into one limited template, so why then are we doing it to our fictitious heroines?
positivelypersistentteach:

actsofknittery:

thegirlwhocriedfoxface:


(x)

Never have I hit reblog so quickly.

All little girls should see this. Truly inspiring!

The artist had a much different purpose for making these than the Tumblr audience seems to understand.  In this article, David Trumble (the artist), is quoted as saying:

“This was a response to the furor kicked up over the glossy ‘princessification’ of Pixar’s Merida character, both in image and doll form. I drew this picture because I wanted to analyze how unnecessary it is to collapse a heroine into one specific mold, to give them all the same sparkly fashion, the same tiny figures, and the same homogenized plastic smile.
My experience of female role models both in culture and in life has shown me that there is no mold for what makes someone a role model, and the whole point of Merida was that she was a step in the right direction, providing girls with an alternative kind of princess. Then they took two steps back, and painted her with the same glossy brush as the rest. So I decided to take 10 real-life female role models, from diverse experiences and backgrounds, and filter them through the Disney princess assembly line.
“The result was this cartoon, which earned equal parts praise and ire from readers. Some didn’t get the joke, some disagreed with it, others saw no harm in it at all and wanted to buy the doll versions of them… it was a polarizing image, but I suppose that’s the point. The statement I wanted to make was that it makes no sense to put these real-life women into one limited template, so why then are we doing it to our fictitious heroines?
positivelypersistentteach:

actsofknittery:

thegirlwhocriedfoxface:


(x)

Never have I hit reblog so quickly.

All little girls should see this. Truly inspiring!

The artist had a much different purpose for making these than the Tumblr audience seems to understand.  In this article, David Trumble (the artist), is quoted as saying:

“This was a response to the furor kicked up over the glossy ‘princessification’ of Pixar’s Merida character, both in image and doll form. I drew this picture because I wanted to analyze how unnecessary it is to collapse a heroine into one specific mold, to give them all the same sparkly fashion, the same tiny figures, and the same homogenized plastic smile.
My experience of female role models both in culture and in life has shown me that there is no mold for what makes someone a role model, and the whole point of Merida was that she was a step in the right direction, providing girls with an alternative kind of princess. Then they took two steps back, and painted her with the same glossy brush as the rest. So I decided to take 10 real-life female role models, from diverse experiences and backgrounds, and filter them through the Disney princess assembly line.
“The result was this cartoon, which earned equal parts praise and ire from readers. Some didn’t get the joke, some disagreed with it, others saw no harm in it at all and wanted to buy the doll versions of them… it was a polarizing image, but I suppose that’s the point. The statement I wanted to make was that it makes no sense to put these real-life women into one limited template, so why then are we doing it to our fictitious heroines?
positivelypersistentteach:

actsofknittery:

thegirlwhocriedfoxface:


(x)

Never have I hit reblog so quickly.

All little girls should see this. Truly inspiring!

The artist had a much different purpose for making these than the Tumblr audience seems to understand.  In this article, David Trumble (the artist), is quoted as saying:

“This was a response to the furor kicked up over the glossy ‘princessification’ of Pixar’s Merida character, both in image and doll form. I drew this picture because I wanted to analyze how unnecessary it is to collapse a heroine into one specific mold, to give them all the same sparkly fashion, the same tiny figures, and the same homogenized plastic smile.
My experience of female role models both in culture and in life has shown me that there is no mold for what makes someone a role model, and the whole point of Merida was that she was a step in the right direction, providing girls with an alternative kind of princess. Then they took two steps back, and painted her with the same glossy brush as the rest. So I decided to take 10 real-life female role models, from diverse experiences and backgrounds, and filter them through the Disney princess assembly line.
“The result was this cartoon, which earned equal parts praise and ire from readers. Some didn’t get the joke, some disagreed with it, others saw no harm in it at all and wanted to buy the doll versions of them… it was a polarizing image, but I suppose that’s the point. The statement I wanted to make was that it makes no sense to put these real-life women into one limited template, so why then are we doing it to our fictitious heroines?
positivelypersistentteach:

actsofknittery:

thegirlwhocriedfoxface:


(x)

Never have I hit reblog so quickly.

All little girls should see this. Truly inspiring!

The artist had a much different purpose for making these than the Tumblr audience seems to understand.  In this article, David Trumble (the artist), is quoted as saying:

“This was a response to the furor kicked up over the glossy ‘princessification’ of Pixar’s Merida character, both in image and doll form. I drew this picture because I wanted to analyze how unnecessary it is to collapse a heroine into one specific mold, to give them all the same sparkly fashion, the same tiny figures, and the same homogenized plastic smile.
My experience of female role models both in culture and in life has shown me that there is no mold for what makes someone a role model, and the whole point of Merida was that she was a step in the right direction, providing girls with an alternative kind of princess. Then they took two steps back, and painted her with the same glossy brush as the rest. So I decided to take 10 real-life female role models, from diverse experiences and backgrounds, and filter them through the Disney princess assembly line.
“The result was this cartoon, which earned equal parts praise and ire from readers. Some didn’t get the joke, some disagreed with it, others saw no harm in it at all and wanted to buy the doll versions of them… it was a polarizing image, but I suppose that’s the point. The statement I wanted to make was that it makes no sense to put these real-life women into one limited template, so why then are we doing it to our fictitious heroines?
positivelypersistentteach:

actsofknittery:

thegirlwhocriedfoxface:


(x)

Never have I hit reblog so quickly.

All little girls should see this. Truly inspiring!

The artist had a much different purpose for making these than the Tumblr audience seems to understand.  In this article, David Trumble (the artist), is quoted as saying:

“This was a response to the furor kicked up over the glossy ‘princessification’ of Pixar’s Merida character, both in image and doll form. I drew this picture because I wanted to analyze how unnecessary it is to collapse a heroine into one specific mold, to give them all the same sparkly fashion, the same tiny figures, and the same homogenized plastic smile.
My experience of female role models both in culture and in life has shown me that there is no mold for what makes someone a role model, and the whole point of Merida was that she was a step in the right direction, providing girls with an alternative kind of princess. Then they took two steps back, and painted her with the same glossy brush as the rest. So I decided to take 10 real-life female role models, from diverse experiences and backgrounds, and filter them through the Disney princess assembly line.
“The result was this cartoon, which earned equal parts praise and ire from readers. Some didn’t get the joke, some disagreed with it, others saw no harm in it at all and wanted to buy the doll versions of them… it was a polarizing image, but I suppose that’s the point. The statement I wanted to make was that it makes no sense to put these real-life women into one limited template, so why then are we doing it to our fictitious heroines?
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